Exhibition | HERE AND NOW

May 16 - June 14, 2024

HERE AND NOW: paintings about place

GIDEON BOK
SUSAN LICHTMAN
TERRY POWERS

5-7pm THURSDAY, MAY 16
Opening Reception and Camden Art Walk

1pm SUNDAY, JUNE 2
Gideon Bok Artist Talk



Ada with Blackberry the Chicken

$12,500
Gideon Bok
Ada with Blackberry the Chicken
oil on linen, 53x33"

Helen and Kevin

$12,500
Gideon Bok
Helen and Kevin
oil on linen, 54x36"

Boston Studio with Glass Skull

$9,000
Gideon Bok
Boston Studio with Glass Skull
oil on linen, 33x32"

Mom

$2,000
Gideon Bok
Mom
oil on linen, 12.5x12.5"

Small Boston Studio with Glass Skull (Take It From The Man!)

$2,000
Gideon Bok
Small Boston Studio with Glass Skull (Take It From The Man!)
oil on linen, 12.5x12.5"

Ada At Their Desk

$12,500
Gideon Bok
Ada At Their Desk
oil on linen, 55x33"

Red Chair

SOLD
Gideon Bok
Red Chair
oil on linen, 24x24"

Hostess

$15,000
Susan Lichtman
Hostess
oil on hemp, 66x40"

Father's Day

$15,000
Susan Lichtman
Father's Day
oil on hemp, 66x40"

Coffee Outside

$15,000
Susan Lichtman
Coffee Outside
oil on hemp, 66x40"

Small Solstice Interior

$1,800
Susan Lichtman
Small Solstice Interior
acrylic gouache on panel, 10x8"

Family After a Meal Square Study

$1,800
Susan Lichtman
Family After a Meal Square Study
acrylic gouache on panel, 12x12"

Pink Studio Doors

$1,800
Susan Lichtman
Pink Studio Doors
acrylic gouache on panel, 10x10"

Backdoor Study

$1,800
Susan Lichtman
Backdoor Study
acrylic gouache on panel, 12x9"

John Pouring and Football Game Study

SOLD
Susan Lichtman
John Pouring and Football Game Study
acrylic gouache on panel, 12x12"

Jared's Light

$8,000
Terry Powers
Jared's Light
oil on canvas, 36x36"

Painting 1

$4,500
Terry Powers
Painting 1
oil on canvas, 24x30"

Our Quilt

$4,500
Terry Powers
Our Quilt
oil on canvas, 24x30"

Spring

$2,000
Terry Powers
Spring
oil on canvas, 16x20"

Winter

$2,000
Terry Powers
Winter
oil on canvas, 16x20"


These artists paint intimate interior views; an art studio, a family home, and the spaces in between. 

GIDEON BOK

Day or night, the paintings … stand as a record of time, the culmination of an abstract layering of fractured moments. As time lapses, pigment amasses, charting the movement and activity of the space... -Chad MacDermid on Gideon Bok

Gideon Bok’s studio is rife with expression and creativity. His easel is at the center, documenting his children painting at a desk and musicians with instruments in hand, each creating their own response to the room. A drum set and amp sit on one side, paintings in progress decorate the walls. Paint supplies and record albums punctuate the room. His painting is a slow process of layers of paint and shifting subjects. Bok's paintings sometimes drip, sometimes carefully render, and sometimes pile up into thick layers of opposing colors. No matter the method, the object of these daubs of paint is to capture moments in varying light, different times of life, and with reminders of those people moving through.

SUSAN LICHTMAN

I am also influenced by cinematography–the way we experience places in films; scanning and focusing over a duration of time. I want to make paintings that are more like cinematographic passages than like still photographs, where the eye can move around and apprehend things slowly. -Susan Lichtman in conversation with Larry Groff, Painting Perceptions, January 2016

Susan Lichtman has lived in her New England home and studio for over thirty years, painting variations of the rooms and people in them with repeated interest and engagement. Lichtman's paintings are like a puzzle, each piece considered and placed, building a complexity of light and shifting spaces. The figures in her paintings simultaneously add energy to her compositions and anchor them. Poses and postures fill the space with activity and personality, while their form grounds the paintings in shapes of color. Lichtman renders the paintings from memory, the architecture of her world so familiar as to be second nature, family and visiting friends framed by a pillar or a kitchen island, a scene within a scene. The result is a portrait of those relationships and a meditation on space.

TERRY POWERS

These paintings do not lecture, they offer you a chair, a cup of coffee and a wonderful conversation about the meaning of life or that thing that happened on the way to the store. They are vital, they are real, and they are necessary in the way that friendship is. They are the subtlest form of treasure. —Tasmin Smith, Juxtapoz, June 2021

Terry Powers approaches his paintings with lush immediate brushwork. He paints from direct observation the objects of a household with young children, painting things as he finds them, in sensitively observed color. The skill of his eye is seen in his rich and subtle colors; his hand in the thick impasto marks that draw us close. Powers suggests his studio and family life through his paintings. We see the character of the house solely through the arrangement of a room and the way things were put down after their last use. A soccer ball, an unfolded quilt, a studio lamp - these things do not look posed, but discovered.